Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

Salmonella outbreak connected to backyard poultry sickens more than 1,000 across 49 states: CDC

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

More than 1,000 people have been sickened by a salmonella outbreak linked to backyard poultry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in an update late last week.

The CDC on Friday announced a total of 1,003 people have been sickened by the outbreak across 49 states — an increase of 235 people since the federal health agency last issued an update in July. At least two people have died and 175 have been hospitalized due to the illness.

As of Friday, 73 people in Ohio were sickened — the most of any state where cases have been reported. Tennessee followed closely behind with 67 cases.

DRUG-RESISTANT SALMONELLA LINKED TO SOFT CHEESE, BEEF SICKENS HUNDREDS: CDC

“Of 850 ill people with age information available, 192 are children younger than 5 years,” the CDC said, adding “epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicate that contact with backyard poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, from multiple hatcheries, are the ly source of these outbreaks.”

Many people reported buying chicks and ducklings from agricultural stores, websites, and hatcheries prior to becoming ill.

“Six of the outbreak strains making people sick have been identified in samples collected from backyard poultry environments at people’s homes in California, Minnesota, and Ohio and from poultry environments at retail stores in Michigan and Oregon,” said the agency.

Symptoms of salmonella usually develop 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria, with most people developing diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

“In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized,” according to the CDC. “Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.”

Federal health officials say that children younger than 5 years of age, pregnant women, adults 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more ly to have a severe illness.

The CDC estimates salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year.

Food is the source for about 1 million of those illnesses.

AMID SALMONELLA OUTBREAK, CDC WARNS: DON'T 'KISS OR SNUGGLE' CHICKENS

In May, when 52 people were affected by the outbreak, the CDC warned to not “kiss or snuggle” chickens. It also issued a list of precautions the public should take when handling the animals to avoid contracting the illness, such as always washing your hands after handling a backyard flock and not letting the birds inside the home — especially in areas where food is prepared.

The CDC also said at the time that children younger than 5 or adults over 65 should avoid handling “chicks, ducklings, or other poultry” altogether.

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/health/salmonella-outbreak-poultry

CDC reports another victim in Salmonella outbreak traced to ground beef

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

Officials say another person is among the victims of a seven-state Salmonella Dublin outbreak that is linked to ground beef. One company has initiated a recall, but federal officials say other unnamed companies also have had positive test results for the pathogen.

In an outbreak update the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 11 people have been confirmed with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin. Eight have been admitted to hospitals and one has died. Illnesses started on dates ranging from Aug. 8 to Oct. 20. The agency is working with the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). 

“USDA-FSIS and state partners traced the source of some of the ground beef eaten by one ill person in this outbreak to Central Valley Meat Co. Inc. On Nov. 15 Central Valley Meat Co. Inc. recalled 34,222 pounds of ground beef produced that may be contaminated with Salmonella Dublin,” according to the CDC update.

“At this time, a single supplier, distributor, or brand of ground beef has not been identified that can account for all the illnesses in this outbreak. The investigation is ongoing and CDC will update the public if more information becomes available.”

Some beef plants have been found by FSIS to be contaminated with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin, but the government has not named them. It is not known at this time if the Central Valley recall is related to the positive findings at the unnamed plants.

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any recalled products or ground beef from other suppliers and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention.

Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis.

Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more ly to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

Editor’s note on Opinion originally posted Nov. 3: At this time, the credibility of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is not to be trusted.

Both agencies have shown a reckless disregard for the public’s right to know, and their reliability going forward remains suspect.

 For the next six weeks, Food Safety News will publish this note above on every story involving the FDA or CDC.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Source: https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/11/cdc-reports-another-victim-in-salmonella-outbreak-traced-to-ground-beef/

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Infantis: Vegetable Trays (2019)

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

Salmonella are a group of bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal illness and fever called salmonellosis. Most people infected with Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

Children younger than five, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems are more ly to have severe salmonellosis infections.

Learn more:

  • FDA – Salmonella
  • FoodSafety.gov – Salmonella
  • CDC – Salmonella

What Else Should Consumers Do?

People should consult their healthcare provider if they suspect that they have developed symptoms that resemble a Salmonella infection.

Consumers should follow these steps for preventing foodborne illness:

  • Wash the inside walls and shelves of the refrigerator, cutting boards and countertops, and utensils that may have contacted contaminated foods; then sanitize them with a solution of one tablespoon of chlorine bleach to one gallon of hot water; dry with a clean cloth or paper towel that has not been previously used.
  • Wash and sanitize surfaces used to serve or store potentially contaminated products.
  • Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.

Consumers can also submit a voluntarily report, a complaint, or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction) related to a food product.

May 22, 2019

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is inspecting the Del Monte Fresh Produce facility that produced vegetable trays that the Wisconsin Department of Health Services linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis. The facility is in Kankakee, Illinois.

On May 21, 2019, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced that vegetable trays produced by Del Monte Fresh Produce Inc. and sold at Kwik Trip convenience stores in Wisconsin and Minnesota are linked to three illnesses in Wisconsin and one illness in Minnesota.

According to Wisconsin authorities, these patients reported becoming ill between April 13 and April 27, 2019, and Kwik Trip has voluntarily removed all Del Monte Fresh Produce vegetable trays from their stores.

The FDA, CDC and state authorities from Wisconsin and Minnesota continue to investigate the cause and source of the outbreak and the distribution of products.

This outbreak is not related to the Cyclospora infections linked to Del Monte Fresh Produce vegetable trays in 2018.

Source: https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-infantis-vegetable-trays-spring-2019

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Javiana: Fruit Mix, December 2019

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

FDA, CDC and state and local partners investigated an outbreak of illnesses caused by Salmonella Javiana.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that fruit mix with cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes from Tailor Cut Produce of North Brunswick, New Jersey, was the source of this outbreak.

CDC has announced this outbreak is over. The FDA’s investigational activities, including an inspection, are complete.

The firm recalled the fruit mix, called Fruit Luau, as well as cut honeydew, cut cantaloupe and cut pineapple products on December 7. The FDA recommended that food service and institutional food operators not sell or serve the recalled products.

In interviews, ill people reported eating cut fruit that was served in the week before illness started.

Ill people reported eating cut fruit that was served in long-term care facilities, hospitals, hotels, schools, or universities.

Several ill people also reported purchasing cut fruit from multiple locations of a grocery store chain. A review of records determined that these locations served or sold cut fruit from Tailor Cut Produce.

The FDA worked with CDC and state partners to trace back the cut fruit and learn more about the potential routes of contamination. Tailor Cut Produce was identified as the common processor, but the source of the contamination was not identified.

When FDA did an inspection at Tailor Cut Produce, the inspectors observed these general deficiencies: the firm’s hazard analysis did not identify a known or reasonably foreseeable hazard that required a preventive control; the firm did not identify a preventive control for a hazard when one was needed; and the firm did not maintain the plant in a clean and sanitary condition and keep the plant in repair. The firm is working with the FDA to address the deficiencies.

As of February 14, 2020, CDC is reporting 165 illnesses were confirmed by Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) in CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, MA, MN, NJ, NY, PA, VA, and WA.

Illnesses were reported from states where Tailor Cut Produce distributes, including Pennsylvania, New York City, New Jersey, and Delaware.

Ill people from other states reported traveling to these states in the week before their illness started.

On this Page

Total Illnesses: 165Hospitalizations: 73Deaths: 0Last illness onset: January 11, 2020

States with Cases: CA, CO, CT, DE (49), FL, GA, IL, MA, MN, NJ (50), NY (7), PA (49), VA, WA

CDC Outbreak Page

Tailor Cut Produce of New Jersey, recalled its Fruit Luau mix, which contains cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes, as well as cut honeydew, cut cantaloupe and cut pineapple products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. The recalled fruit products were distributed in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Delaware between November 15 and December 1, 2019. More recall information can be found on the FDA website.

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella are a group of bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal illness and fever called salmonellosis. Most people infected with Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

Children younger than five, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems are more ly to have severe salmonellosis infections.

Learn more:

  • FDA – Salmonella
  • FoodSafety.gov – Salmonella
  • CDC – Salmonella

General Food Safety Tips for Restaurants and Retailers

Restaurants and retailers should always practice safe food handling and preparation measures. It is recommended that employees wash hands, utensils, and surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling food.

  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the lihood of cross-contamination.
  • Wash and sanitize display cases and refrigerators regularly.
  • Wash and sanitize cutting boards, surfaces, and utensils used to prepare, serve, or store food.
  • Wash hands with hot water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process. 

Learn more:

General Food Safety Tips for Consumers

People should consult their healthcare provider if they suspect that they have developed symptoms that resemble a Salmonella infection. 

Consumers should follow these steps for preventing foodborne illness:

  • Wash the inside walls and shelves of the refrigerator, cutting boards and countertops, and utensils that may have contacted contaminated foods; then sanitize them with a solution of one tablespoon of chlorine bleach to one gallon of hot water; dry with a clean cloth or paper towel that has not been previously used.
  • Wash and sanitize surfaces used to serve or store potentially contaminated products.
  • Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.

Consumers can also submit a voluntarily report, a complaint, or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction) related to a food product.

Produce items should be rinsed in clean, running water without the use of cleaners or soaps. After washing, dry produce with a clean cloth towel or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present on the surface.

Even if you do not plan to eat the skin, it is still important to wash produce first so dirt and bacteria are not transferred from the surface when peeling or cutting produce.

Scrub firm produce, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush.

Previous Updates

January 2, 2020

As of December 31, 2019, CDC is reporting 96 illnesses confirmed by Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) in CA, CO, CT, DE, IL, MN, NJ, NY, PA, VA, and WA.

Illnesses were reported from states where Tailor Cut Produce distributes, including Pennsylvania, New York City, New Jersey, and Delaware.

Ill people from other states reported traveling to these states in the week before their illness started. CDC reports only cases confirmed by WGS, and these numbers may differ from the numbers that states are investigating.

FDA’s inspection at Tailor Cut Produce is ongoing. FDA is currently collecting records to support a traceback investigation and will provide updates as more information becomes available.

December 11, 2019

According to CDC, there are currently 11 illnesses confirmed by Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) in Pennsylvania and Minnesota. The person from Minnesota traveled to New York at the time of infection. CDC reports only cases confirmed by WGS, and these numbers may differ from the numbers that states are investigating but are awaiting WGS confirmation to be included in the outbreak.

FDA has initiated an inspection at Tailor Cut Produce and is currently collecting records to support a traceback investigation. FDA will continue its investigation and provide updates as more information becomes available.

December 09, 2019

FDA and the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) are investigating an outbreak of illnesses caused by Salmonella Javiana in Pennsylvania.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicate that fruit mix with cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes from Tailor Cut Produce of North Brunswick, New Jersey, are a potential source of this outbreak.

The firm recalled the fruit mix, called Fruit Luau, as well as cut honeydew, cut cantaloupe and cut pineapple products on December 7. 

The Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) reports that it is investigating 33 laboratory-confirmed illnesses of Salmonella at four healthcare facilities in southeast Pennsylvania. Salmonella Javiana has been identified among cases at three of four facilities.

According to the Pennsylvania DOH the epidemiologic evidence collected thus far indicates that the Fruit Luau fruit mix (which contains cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes) from Tailor Cut Produce is a potential source of the illnesses.

The state’s review of invoices shows that a common food eaten by many case patients was this fruit mix.

FDA has activated a team to coordinate its outbreak investigation.  On December 6, 2019, the FDA and the Pennsylvania DOH shared the results of the investigation thus far with the firm, and the firm’s leadership stated that they would work with FDA to implement a recall of the products. On December 7, Tailor Cut Produce announced a recall.

FDA will continue its investigation and provide updates as more information becomes available.

December 6, 2019

FDA and the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) are investigating an outbreak of illnesses caused by Salmonella Javiana in Pennsylvania.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicate that fruit mix with cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes from Tailor Cut Produce of North Brunswick, New Jersey, are a potential source of this outbreak.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) reports that it is investigating 31 laboratory-confirmed illnesses of Salmonella at four healthcare facilities in southeast Pennsylvania. Salmonella Javiana has been identified among cases at three of four facilities.

According to the Pennsylvania DOH the epidemiologic evidence collected thus far indicates that this fruit mix is a potential source of the illnesses.

The state’s review of invoices shows that a common food eaten by many case patients was the fruit mix with cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, and grapes from Tailor Cut Produce. View the Pennsylvania DOH Press Release.

FDA has activated a team to coordinate its outbreak investigation.  On December 6, 2019, the FDA and the Pennsylvania DOH shared the results of the investigation thus far with the firm, and the firm’s leadership stated that they would work with FDA to implement a recall of this product.

FDA will continue its investigation and provide updates as more information becomes available.

Source: https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-javiana-fruit-mix-december-2019

Public Health Notice

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

Advice for consumers on safe food handling practices

OTTAWA, Dec. 18, 2019 /CNW/ – Update

This public health notice update is being issued to inform Canadians of the investigation findings to date and to share important safe food-handling practices to help prevent further Salmonella infections. Sixteen additional illnesses have been reported in the ongoing outbreak investigation. There are now 126 illnesses under investigation.

The Public Health Agency of Canada continues to remind Canadians to always handle raw turkey and raw chicken carefully, and to cook it thoroughly to prevent food-related illnesses Salmonella.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey or chicken products, nor is it advising retailers to stop selling raw turkey and raw chicken products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has not issued any food recall warnings related to this outbreak.

Why should you take note

The Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with provincial and territorial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate an outbreak of Salmonella infections.

the investigation findings to date, exposure to raw turkey and raw chicken products has been identified as the ly source of the outbreak. Many of the individuals who became sick reported eating different types of turkey and chicken products before their illnesses occurred.

The outbreak appears to be ongoing, as recent illnesses continue to be reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Salmonella bacteria are commonly found in raw or undercooked poultry turkey or chicken. The bacteria are most-often transmitted to people when they improperly handle, eat or cook contaminated foods.

This outbreak is a reminder of the importance of using safe food handling practices if you are preparing, cooking, cleaning or storing raw turkey and raw chicken products. These raw products can have bacteria that can easily be spread around food preparation areas and can make you sick if safe food-handling practices are not properly followed.

Canadians across the country are reminded to always handle raw turkey and raw chicken carefully, and to cook it thoroughly to prevent food-related illnesses Salmonella. The Public Health Agency of Canada is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey or chicken products, nor is it advising retailers to stop selling raw turkey and raw chicken products.

This public health notice update is being issued to inform Canadians of the investigation findings to date and to share important safe food-handling practices to help prevent further Salmonella infections. This notice will be updated as the investigation evolves.

Investigation summary

As of December 18, 2019, there have been 126 confirmed cases of Salmonella Reading illness investigated in the following provinces and territories: British Columbia (31), Alberta (44), Saskatchewan (8), Manitoba (24), Ontario (8), Quebec (2), New Brunswick (1), Prince Edward Island (1), Northwest Territories (1), and Nunavut (6). Individuals became sick between April 2017 and November 2019. Thirty-eight individuals have been hospitalized. One individual has died. Individuals who became ill are between 0 and 96 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are male.

The collaborative outbreak investigation was initiated due to an increase of Salmonella Reading illnesses that occurred in October and November 2018. Cases have continued to be reported since the investigation was initiated.

Through the use of a laboratory method called whole genome sequencing, some Salmonella illnesses dating back to 2017 were identified to have the same genetic strain as the illnesses that occurred in late 2018.

The majority of illnesses under investigation occurred between October 2018 and November 2019.

It is possible that more recent illnesses may be reported in the outbreak because there is a period of time between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported to public health officials. For this outbreak, the illness reporting period is usually between 5 and 6 weeks.

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S. CDC) previously investigated similar Salmonella illnesses in several states that were linked to raw turkey exposure.

There were some turkey products recalled in the U.S. that were associated with that outbreak. These products were not imported or distributed in the Canadian marketplace. The U.S.

investigation was closed in April 2019.

Who is most at risk

Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are more fragile.

Most people who become ill from a Salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days. It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.

What should you do to protect your health

Raw turkey and raw chicken products carrying Salmonella may look, smell and taste normal, so it's important to always follow safe food-handling tips if you are buying, chilling, thawing, cleaning, cooking and storing any type of raw poultry food products.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is reminding Canadians to always handle raw turkey and raw chicken carefully, and to cook it thoroughly to prevent food-related illnesses Salmonella. You can use the following food safety tips to help protect you and your family:

  • Always wash your hands before and after you touch raw turkey and raw chicken. Wash with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand rub if soap and water are not available.
  • Always cook turkey and chicken products to a safe internal temperature that has been checked using a digital thermometer.
  • Turkey and chicken breasts, as well as ground poultry, including turkey and chicken burgers, should always be cooked to an internal temperature of 74°C (165°F) to kill any harmful bacteria. Whole turkey and chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of 82°C (180°F).
  • Leftovers should be reheated to 74°C (165°F). Use a digital food thermometer to check, and place it in the thickest part of the food.
  • Thaw frozen raw turkey and raw chicken in the fridge. Thawing raw turkey and raw chicken at room temperature can allow bacteria to grow.
  • Never rinse raw turkey or raw chicken before cooking it because the bacteria can spread wherever the water splashes.
  • Use a separate plate, cutting board, utensils and kitchen tools when preparing raw turkey and raw chicken.
  • Clean everything that has come in contact with raw turkey or raw chicken with a kitchen cleaner or bleach solution and then rinse with water.
    • Kitchen cleaner (follow the instructions on the container)
    • Bleach solution (5 mL household bleach to 750 mL of water)
  • Keep raw turkey and raw chicken away from other food while shopping, storing, repackaging, cooking and serving foods.
  • If you have been diagnosed with a Salmonella infection or any other gastrointestinal illness, do not cook food for other people.
  • Do not feed raw ground turkey or raw ground chicken to your pets. Bacteria Salmonella in raw pet food can make your pets sick. Your family also can get sick by handling the raw food or by taking care of your pet.
  • For more information, read our poultry safety fact sheet.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a Salmonella infection, called salmonellosis, typically start 6 to 72 hours after exposure to Salmonella bacteria from an infected animal or contaminated product.

Symptoms include:

  • fever
  • chills
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal cramps
  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting

These symptoms usually last for four to seven days. In healthy people, salmonellosis often clears up without treatment. In some cases, severe illness and hospitalization may occur. In some cases, antibiotics may be required.

People who are infected with Salmonella bacteria can be infectious from several days to several weeks.

People who experience symptoms, or who have underlying medical conditions, should contact their health care provider if they suspect they have a Salmonella infection.

What is the Government of Canada doing

The Government of Canada is committed to food safety. The Public Health Agency of Canada leads the human health investigation into an outbreak and is in regular contact with its federal, provincial and territorial partners to monitor the situation and to collaborate on steps to address an outbreak.

Health Canada provides food-related health risk assessments to determine whether the presence of a certain substance or microorganism poses a health risk to consumers.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency conducts food safety investigations into the possible food source of an outbreak.

The Government of Canada will continue to update Canadians if new information related to these investigations becomes available.

Additional information

SOURCE Public Health Agency of Canada

Source: https://www.biospace.com/article/public-health-notice-outbreak-of-salmonella-illnesses-linked-to-raw-turkey-and-raw-chicken-dec-18-2019/

NEWS SCAN: Thermal scanners score low, update on sprouts outbreak, Salmonella screen

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

Jan 6, 2011

Study: Thermal scanners aren't good flu finders
In a trial of thermal scanners in an airport setting, the devices were moderately successful at detecting fever but didn't perform well at flagging passengers with influenza, New Zealand researcher report in Public Library of Science (PLoS) One. They conducted the study during part of the 2008 Southern Hemisphere flu season (Aug 21 through Sep 12). The dominant strain was influenza B, which is less ly to cause febrile illness than influenza A strains. The study included 1,275 airline passengers who were flying from Australia to Christchurch, New Zealand. Passengers underwent thermal scanning and agreed to tympanic temperature measurement and respiratory sampling. Researchers found 0.5% were febrile and that the positive predictive value (PPV) of thermal screening was 1.5%. They identified influenza in 30 of the travelers, but none of them had fever upon tympanic measurement, and only 3 were symptomatic. The PPV of thermal scanning for flu was 2.8%. The researchers concluded that thermal scanning is not ly to be effective for detecting flu in travelers, even when influenza A is more common, and probably won't help stop infected travelers from entering a country.
Jan 5 PLoS One abstract

Salmonella outbreak from sprouts grows to 112
Eighteen more patients have been sickened in a Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- outbreak linked to an Illinois company's alfalfa sprouts, raising the total to 112, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today. Two more states, Colorado and Kentucky, reported their first cases, raising the number of affected states to 18, plus the District of Columbia. The latest illness onset date is Dec 24, and the hospitalization rate for patients for whom information is available is 24%, the same as in the CDC's last update on Dec 28. No deaths have been reported. About half of the cases are from Illinois, and many of the sick people ate sandwiches containing sprouts at Jimmy John's outlets. An investigation into the source of contamination is ongoing.
Jan 6 CDC outbreak update

Simple screen ID's salmonellosis from consumer complaints
Researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health have developed a tool for screening consumer complaints to identify ly cases of salmonellosis, according to a study in the current issue of the Journal of Food Protection.

They examined previous illness complaints in which the causative agent had been identified and developed a predictive model for Salmonella.

They then tested variations that maximized sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability, with the three versions providing sensitivities and specificities of 32% and 96%, 100% and 54%, and 89% and 72%, respectively.

The screen that provided the best predictive ability for Salmonella was a caller reporting diarrhea and fever with no vomiting, and five or fewer people sick.

They write, “Screening calls for etiology would help identify complaints for further follow-up and result in identifying Salmonella cases that would otherwise go unconfirmed; in turn, this could lead to the identification of more outbreaks.” The team published in November 2010 in the same journal a report on a statewide consumer complaint surveillance system that uncovered 79% of foodborne outbreaks in Minnesota in the study period, including 25% of salmonellosis outbreaks.
Jan J Food Prot abstract
Nov 2010 J Food Prot abstract

Source: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2011/01/news-scan-thermal-scanners-score-low-update-sprouts-outbreak-salmonella

Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Raw Turkey Products — United States, 2017–2019

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

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Find articles by Colin BaslerAuthor information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

1Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC; 2CAITTA, Inc., Herndon, Virginia; 3Minnesota Department of Health, Saint Paul, Minnesota; 4Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.

C. and Athens, Georgia; 5Minnesota Department of Agriculture, Saint Paul, Minnesota; 6Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland; 7Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Riverdale Park, Maryland; 8Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Lansing, Michigan; 9Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Lansing, Michigan; 10Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, Arizona; 11Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines, Iowa; 12DC Health, Washington, D.C.; 13Eagle Medical Services, Huntsville, Alabama.

Corresponding author.

Corresponding Rashida Hassan, vog.cdc@1nassahr, 404-639-1727.

All material in the MMWR Series is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

During 2018–2019, CDC, local and state public health partners, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of 356 Salmonella Reading infections from 42 states and the District of Columbia (DC) linked to turkey.

The outbreak strain was isolated from raw turkey products, raw turkey pet food, and live turkeys. In July 2018, CDC and USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) shared outbreak investigation results with representatives from the U.S.

turkey industry, engaging with an industry group rather than a specific company for the first time during an outbreak, and CDC issued a public investigation notice. During the investigation, four recalls of turkey products were issued.

Evidence suggested that the outbreak strain of Salmonella was widespread in the turkey industry, and therefore, interventions should target all parts of the supply chain, including slaughter and processing facilities and upstream farm sources.

In January 2018, through routine state surveillance, Minnesota Department of Health investigators identified four Salmonella Reading infections with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, suggesting they ly shared a common source.

One patient had consumed ground turkey, and two lived in the same household where pets in the home ate raw turkey pet food. Minnesota investigators also identified this same strain in one sample of retail ground turkey.

This PFGE pattern is the most common subtype of Salmonella Reading; however, the Reading serotype is uncommon, not ranking in the 20 most common types of human Salmonella infections reported in the United States (1).

In response to Minnesota’s investigation, PulseNet,* the national laboratory network for foodborne disease surveillance, was queried for additional Salmonella infections with this PFGE pattern. CDC began a multistate cluster investigation, collecting information on patient exposures from local and state health departments and information on food and pet food products from FDA and FSIS.

CDC defined a case as an infection with Salmonella Reading with the outbreak PFGE pattern with illness onset from during November 20, 2017–March 31, 2019. Patients were interviewed to collect information on consumption of turkey and other poultry foods, exposure to raw poultry pet food, and contact with live poultry.

Investigators from DC Health and the Iowa Department of Health identified two illness subclusters of cases in which attendees ate at a common event before becoming ill.

The two events occurred in November 2018 and February 2019, and 152 persons became ill, including 51 whose clinical isolates matched the outbreak strain and 101 who had clinically compatible illness without culture confirmation of Salmonella infection.

Investigators identified whole turkey and boneless roast turkey as the food items significantly associated with illness at these two events and found that turkey was not handled or prepared in accordance with FSIS guidelines and was not held at proper temperatures to prevent bacterial growth (2).

Overall, 356 outbreak cases from 42 states and DC were identified (Figure 1) (Figure 2). Patients ranged in age from

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6871895/

Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Ground Beef

Update on the U.S. Salmonella outbreak

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Dublin infections linked to ground beef.

Since the last update on November 18, 2019, two additional ill people were reported from Colorado and New Mexico. A total of 13 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin were reported from eight states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 8, 2019, to October 22, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from 39 to 74 years, with a median age of 66. Sixty-two percent of ill people were male. Of 11 ill people with information available, 9 (82%) were hospitalized.

One death was reported from California. In six (46%) ill people, Salmonella was found in samples of blood, which indicates their illnesses may have been more severe.

Salmonella Dublin is known to commonly cause more severe illnesses than other Salmonella strains, particularly in older people.

Whole genome sequencing analysis did not identify any antibiotic resistance in 20 bacterial isolates from 13 ill people and seven food specimens. Testing of two clinical isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing methods by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) confirmed these results.

Investigation of the Outbreak

Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that ground beef was the ly source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of nine people interviewed, eight (89%) reported eating ground beef at home.

This percentage was significantly higher than results from a survey pdf icon[PDF – 787 KB] of healthy people in which 40% of respondents reported eating any ground beef at home in the week before they were interviewed.

Ill people reported buying ground beef from various stores.

Laboratory testing identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin in repackaged leftover ground beef collected from an ill person’s home in California. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin was also identified in six samples of raw beef products from slaughter and processing establishments.

Samples from slaughter and processing establishments were collected as part of FSIS’s routine testing under the Salmonella performance standards. WGS showed that the Salmonella strain from these samples was closely related genetically to the Salmonella from ill people.

These results provided more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating ground beef.

USDA-FSIS and state partners traced the source of some of the ground beef eaten by one ill person in this outbreak to Central Valley Meat Co., Inc. On November 15, 2019, Central Valley Meat Co., Inc., recalledexternal icon 34,222 pounds of ground beef produced that may be contaminated with Salmonella Dublin.

A single supplier, distributor, or brand of ground beef was not identified that could account for all the illnesses in this outbreak.

As of December 30, 2019, this outbreak appears to be over.

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Source: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/dublin-11-19/index.html