Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Contents
  1. Stomach Soothers
  2. Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief
  3. 11 Superstar Stomach Soothers
  4. Settle The Queasies
  5. Relieve Gas
  6. Stop the Bathroom Runs
  7. Help Heartburn
  8. 14 Home Remedies To Try After Accidental Gluten Ingestion Source: https://www.gnom-gnom.com/14-home-remedies-accidental-gluten-ingestion/ 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) Ready to restore sanity to your house? These safe, all-natural baby teething remedies really work to ease teething pain for good. Teething is no joke. It can turn even the most relaxed baby into a hot mess. Luckily, there are plenty of safe and effective natural teething remedies—no ibuprofen required. Let’s take a closer look. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure Stomach Soothers Jamie Chung Tummy troubles are never pretty, but they can be remedied with these options. Jamie Chung When to use them: When you get that roiling feeling. What they do: Antacids, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain an element calcium or magnesium to neutralize the acid secreted by your stomach lining. Products such as Pepcid and Zantac, called H2 blockers, also help reduce the amount of acid that your stomach produces, alleviating reflux symptoms. Be sure to use antacids as directed; you should take them to treat occasional pain, not pop them Tic Tacs. “Once in a while, sure, it’s fine to use antacids,” says Larry Weiss, a physician in San Francisco and a former consultant to the cruise industry on infectious stomach viruses. “But if you’re taking them on a regular basis, you should talk to your doctor to find out exactly what the problem is.” Advertisement Advertisement Jamie Chung When to use it: When you are not near your own bathroom and can’t let a case of diarrhea subside naturally. What it does: This ingredient (also known as pink bismuth) is found in over-the-counter products, Kaopectate and Pepto-Bismol, and doubles as an antacid and an anti-inflammatory. It works, and sometimes too well: A common side effect is constipation. “Most diarrhea just needs to run its course,” says Weiss. “It’s best to let it clear up on its own.” (Note: This medicine should not be given to children. Salicylates, in rare cases, have been shown to cause Reye’s syndrome.) Jamie Chung When to eat them: After diarrhea or stomach upset. What they do: “The BRATT diet has been used for years to help treat diarrhea,” says Lauren Slayton, a registered dietitian in New York City. Bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast, plus tea, are the dream team to soothe stomach cramps and replenish your system. Such bland foods, containing simple sugars and starches with low acidity, are less ly to cause more distress. And they supply easily digested nourishment. Yogurt is another safe bet. Advertisement Jamie Chung When to drink them: After you’ve vomited (or otherwise expelled the contents of your angry stomach). What they do: When you lose fluids, you lose electrolytes and other nutrients. Drinking Gatorade will rehydrate you, but Slayton prefers coconut water, a natural source of electrolytes and potassium (try O.N.E. coconut water, found in supermarkets). Weiss s green, oolong, or blackberry-root tea, all of which have antioxidants and “soothe on an emotional level,” he says. Jamie Chung When to use them: If your stomach hurts or you feel bloated; use daily if you have chronic digestive issues. What they do: The wonder botanicals ginger, peppermint, and fennel are natural remedies. Ginger—freshly grated, dried, or candied—“improves the ease with which food moves through your system as it digests,” says Weiss. (Good old ginger ale contains little, if any, ginger; its curative values are largely anecdotal. ) Peppermint can aid digestion and settle the stomach because it contains properties that dispel gas and relieve cramping. Fennel seeds (nibbled on or drunk in a tea) can relieve bloating and minimize gas. Drink ginger, peppermint, or fennel tea after a rich or spicy meal to avoid indigestion. If you regularly suffer from stomach upset, Slayton suggests you consult a doctor and take a peppermint-oil capsule ( Heather’s Tummy Tamers; , amazon.com) daily to help line and soothe your intestines. Jamie Chung When to use them: If you have stomach issues regularly. Try taking them daily, via foods or supplements. What they do: Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that help maintain a healthy digestive tract. (Conversely, antibiotics kill bacteria, both good and bad. ) “Probiotics are your friends,” says Weiss. “We’re still not sure why exactly they work, but once people start taking them, many find they feel better.” Dairy products, yogurt, kefir, and buttermilk, contain different strains of acidophilus, a powerful probiotic. (The probiotics in yogurt have actually been shown to shorten the duration of stomach upset.) You can also find supplements, Culturelle, and chewable probiotic tablets in health-food stores. Look for Lactobacillus GG, an extensively studied form of acidophilus, or Bifidobacterium bifidum, also believed to be a well-tolerated immunity booster. Advertisement Advertisement Source: https://www.realsimple.com/health/first-aid-health-basics/medicine-cabinet/stomach-soothers Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief If you’re the type of person who keeps Rolaids in her pocket and Pepto-Bismol in her desk drawer, consider adding herbal teas to your stash to help you feel your best. Since what we eat and drink (especially dairy products, sugar, alcohol, and coffee) often triggers conditions gas, bloating, indigestion, heartburn, constipation, and diarrhea, how better to treat these common gastrointestinal problems, herbalists say, than by ingesting herbs that naturally offset the culprits? But with the ever growing variety of herbal teas and home remedies clogging the shelves of health food stores, it’s hard to know which ones will really help. There are numerous herbs that can affect the gastrointestinal system, according to Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden in London, Ontario. Luckily, you don’t need to buy out the entire store to get relief. Peppermint, chamomile, and ginger are the three herbs most commonly used to soothe abdominal symptoms. “They’re versatile and a good place to start,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D. (doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore. Peppermint can do a lot more after dinner than just freshen your breath. The herb’s essential oil contains menthol, a volatile substance that has a direct antispasmodic effect on the smooth muscle of the digestive tract. In addition, the pleasing smell of peppermint tea may help soothe nerves (and thus a nervous stomach). The ability to calm cramping stomach and intestinal muscles makes it a superb treatment, herbalists say, for symptoms of indigestion including heartburn, gas, stomachache, and the “I ate too much” feeling. It also makes peppermint a popular alternative treatment for irritable bowel syndrome(IBS), an intestinal disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, and irregular bowel movements in up to 1 in 5 Canadians. Science is starting to back up some of mint’s claims. A study published in the Journal of Gastroenterology in 1997 found that IBS patients taking peppermint-oil capsules for symptom relief experienced an approximately 40 per cent greater reduction in abdominal pain and a 50 per cent greater reduction in bloating and flatulence than those patients receiving a placebo. A carminative (gas-relieving) herb, peppermint in the form of tea has long been used as a home remedy for flatulence. A 1996 German study validates this usage, finding that patients with chronic indigestion not caused by an ulcer who were treated with an herbal preparation of peppermint oil combined with caraway oil (a bitter herb also believed to relieve gastrointestinal ailments) experienced about half as much abdominal pain due to gas as did people who received a placebo. Even in the absence of abdominal symptoms, some herbalists recommend regular consumption of peppermint tea, saying it allows the entire gastrointestinal system to function more fluidly. But, despite the enthusiastic reports, many doctors say that peppermint can lower the sphincter pressure of the esophagus, actually causing some people to have more heartburn. Even Dr. Stansbury avoids treating heartburn with peppermint. If, however, people do experience relief from indigestion with peppermint or any other herbal therapy, Col. Peter McNally, D.O. (doctor of osteopathy), a gastroenterologist at the Evans Army Hospital in Colorado Springs, Colo., sees no harm in continuing to use the herb. “At the very least, the extra consumption of water (through the teas) can be quite helpful in aiding digestion,” he says. Chamomile, considered to be one of the safest medicinal herbs, is frequently recommended as a gentle treatment for common gastrointestinal problems. In Germany, where herbalism has long been considered conventional, tradition holds chamomile to be so useful that it has been dubbed alles zutraut, or “capable of anything. ” Indeed, for gastrointestinal ailments, it’s somewhat of a superherb. Antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, and carminative, chamomile can act upon the digestive system in a number of healing ways. It relieves flatulence and heartburn by mildly sedating and soothing the mucous membrane of the digestive tract. Its natural sedative properties can also relax the entire body, which may help if your digestive discomfort is caused by stress or worry. A caveat: While some research has found chamomile to be effective in relieving diarrhea in young children, Dr. Stansbury strongly cautions against self-treating diarrhea with herbal remedies (for children or adults) until you have consulted with a medical professional. “The body may be trying to rid itself of a toxin or harmful substance, and you don’t want to interrupt that process,” she advises. Though widely used and highly praised as a safe natural remedy, chamomile may cause allergic reactions in individuals with sensitivities to ragweed, asters, and chrysanthemums. Ginger, peppermint and chamomile, is a carminative and can be used to treat gas, along with its associated bloating and pain. In botanical medicine it’s considered a warming herb, one that causes the inside of the body to generate more heat. Herbalists say this can help regulate sluggish digestion, though Dr. Stansbury points out that some find this extra warmth uncomfortable and may instead prefer peppermint or chamomile teas. But what makes ginger a standout among herbs is its effectiveness in treating nausea and vomiting. (Remember Mom giving you ginger ale when you had a stomachache?) Herbalists now know that ginger works against both nausea and vomiting, making it an excellent preventive against motion and morning sickness. And un its drug counterparts, ginger doesn’t cause drowsiness. Perhaps that’s why it’s a favourite in many a sailor’s first-aid kit. Teas to ease an aching stomach “Teas are the best way to take herbal gastrointestinal remedies,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D. (doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore. The warm liquid is easy to digest and allow the remedy direct contact with the stomach and intestinal walls. Herbs in pill form can be hard to digest, and most tinctures contain alcohol, causing them to be absorbed largely in the mouth. The one exception: Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers may use peppermint or chamomile tea and may also take peppermint in capsule form. The capsule allows the mint to maintain its potency until it reaches the intestines, where it calms the spasms characteristic of IBS. Look for enteric-coated capsules containing .2 millilitre of oil; take one or two, up to three times a day between meals. How to choose the tea for you When selecting a tea, Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden, recommends looking for aromatic herbs: Can you smell the peppermint or ginger through the teabag? If not, the herb is probably past its prime. Look for a tea that has the date the herbs were harvested on the box; aromatic herbs should be less than a year old. Next time your digestive system flares up, try one of these teas: Peppermint: For a minty fresh herbal aid, the Herb Research Foundation in Boulder, Colo., recommends the following ratio of peppermint to water: Steep one to two teaspoons of dried peppermint leaves, or one tablespoon of fresh leaves, in one cup of hot water for five to 10 minutes; sweeten as needed with honey; and drink in the morning and after dinner. Chamomile: Substitute dried or fresh chamomile flowers for the peppermint leaves in the above tea preparation. Ginger: Steep ¼ to ½ teaspoon of dried ginger root powder in one cup of hot water. Sweeten with honey and drink at night as a digestive aid, or prepare as needed to prevent motion sickness. Fresh ginger is delicious and just as effective as the dried kind. Dr. Stansbury suggests simmering three ¼-in. peeled slices of the root in one cup of water for 10 minutes, or to desired strength. Flavour with lemon and honey. If you need immediate help on hand for your next trip to the amusement park, dried or candied ginger will also do the trick. Originally published as Stomach Soothers on ReadersDigest.com. Source: https://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/health/stomach-soothers/ 11 Superstar Stomach Soothers Skip the pale pink bottle. These cure-alls are proven to relieve stomach symptoms naturally. Settle The Queasies 1. Pep Up with Peppermint Peppermint contains menthol, which is a digestive aid. Try peppermint tea to ease nausea and vomiting. It’s simple to make your own pure cup (no sugar or other artificial flavors!) by steeping 1 tablespoon peppermint leaves in 1 cup hot water and then straining. 2. Rein It in with a Rub Gently rubbing a point on your wrist has been proven to work as well as some drugs designed to fight nausea! To find the spot, turn your hand so that your palm is facing up. Measure three finger-widths down from your wrist. The spot is between the two tendons. Apply gentle downward pressure as you massage for 5 seconds. 3. Can the Nausea You may be able to settle an upset stomach with canned pear juice. Honestly, there is no scientific reason that has been uncovered as to why this trick works, but tons of people swear by it! Some doctors suspect it’s similar to the old-time remedy of cola syrup. 4. Stop Olive the Rumbling Feel the pits due to motion sickness? Bring some olives along next time! Motion sickness causes you to make excess saliva, which can give you a gaggy feeling. But olives contain tannins, which dry out your mouth. Munching a few when you first start to feel the queasies may settle the nausea. Sucking on a lemon can produce the same effect. 5. Night Moves If you’re prone to motion sickness, try to travel as much as you can at night. You’ll be less ly to feel sick when you can’t see the motion as well as you would during the day. Relieve Gas 6. Send Gas Away with Caraway End your meal with a cup of tea to head off any after-dinner grumbling. Simply sip 1 cup hot water steeped with 1 teaspoon caraway seeds. Caraway can improve digestion and relieve intestinal spasms. For gas relief on the go, carry sugar-coated fennel seeds. In fact, many Indian restaurants server sugar-coated fennel seeds instead of after-dinner mints. Stop the Bathroom Runs 7. Save Those Pomegranate Peels From trash to a digestive treasure! Tea made from pomegranate peels can appease your belly and help healing start to happen. Next time you enjoy the fruit, grind the washed and dried peels in a blender or coffee grinder. The resulting powder will keep in the fridge for up to 6 months. Then when you need relief, steep a teaspoon of the powder in a cup of boiling water for 3 minutes, strain, add a bit of honey, and sip slowly. Help Heartburn 8. Grab Some Gum Chewing gum boosts saliva production, and that saliva neutralizes acid and helps push digestive juices back down where they belong. 9. Adjust Your Sleeping Position If you sleep on your right side, roll over! The esophagus enters the stomach on the right side. Sleeping on your left side prevents food in your stomach from pressing on the opening to the esophagus, a good bet to bring on reflux. 10. A Legit Reason for More Bed Pillows Sleeping with your head elevated prevents stomach acid from flowing into your esophagus. 11. Soothe with Juice Sure, aloe is soothing for your skin, but can it really help your digestive tract? Some people with acid reflux swear it relieves heartburn symptoms. Backing up the claims, a study found drinking about an ounce of aloe vera syrup could safely relieve reflux symptoms. Run the idea by your doctor to see if it could work for you. Bruce Lubin and Jeanne Bossolina-Lubin are the proud parents of three boys and more than a dozen books. After saving thousands per year using everyday tips and simple lifehacks, they started their own business in the hopes of sharing their knowledge with others. They have been known to go into their friends' refrigerators to turn their eggs upside down so that they last longer. Source: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/11-superstar-stomach-soothers 14 Home Remedies To Try After Accidental Gluten Ingestion Source: https://www.gnom-gnom.com/14-home-remedies-accidental-gluten-ingestion/ 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) Ready to restore sanity to your house? These safe, all-natural baby teething remedies really work to ease teething pain for good. Teething is no joke. It can turn even the most relaxed baby into a hot mess. Luckily, there are plenty of safe and effective natural teething remedies—no ibuprofen required. Let’s take a closer look. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure It’s one of the older natural teething remedies in the book, but using cold and pressure to help baby’s aching gums is an excellent teething remedy. Give baby safe, non-toxic objects that can be frozen and then used to chew on. The cold helps numb the area, and the pressure soothes inflamed gums. Here are some examples: Frozen washcloths:Soak a small washcloth in water, wring out, then freeze for at least an hour. Let baby chew on the washcloth after it comes the freezer. Frozen fruit or veggies: Put these foods in a mesh or silicone teether for small babies and freeze for at least an hour. For older babies, put a banana in the freezer for a tasty snack that’s also one of the best natural teething remedies. A cold spoon: Put a metal spoon in the fridge for at least 15 minutes, then give it to baby to gum. Natural teething biscuits: These biscuits are easy to make and don’t contain questionable ingredients the ones you buy in the store (even the organic ones!). They can be kept in the refrigerator for a cooler treat. Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys Something to chew on is sometimes one of the only natural teething remedies baby really needs to get through the pain of teething. There are lots of options for teething toys that are also safe and non-toxic. Silicone teething rings: Made of safe silicone, rather than latex or plastic, this teether is a safe choice. Wooden teethers: What works for one baby may not work for the next, so if silicone and rubber don’t do it, try a wooden teether. The texture might be just right for your baby. Just be sure to choose a brand that uses natural water-based sealants or food grade dyes. And be aware that some teethers need to be oiled or (bees)waxed before use. Sophie used to be the gold-standard when it came to natural teething remedies. But there’s been controversy after some moms found mold inside their toys. Until the manufacturer solves this problem, we don’t recommend this teether. Get free updates on baby’s first year! – Free Updates on First Year [In-article] Sign me up! Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces Amber necklaces Amber necklaces If you’ve been around the natural mama circuit, you’ve ly seen those cute amber necklaces on infants. They are actually amber necklaces. The idea is that baby’s body heat triggers the baltic amber to release an oil that contains succinic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory. Whether they work is up for debate, but many parents swear by them. Just be sure to get a real one—there are lots of fake amber teething necklaces. And if you do choose to try an amber necklace, be sure to remove it when baby goes to sleep, or wrap it around a wrist or ankle. Amber teething necklace Mama Natural Teething necklaces for mom Teething necklaces for mom Another option is a teething necklace for mom. These necklaces are made of silicone and are great for baby to use while sitting in mom’s lap or in a baby carrier. They also act as something for baby to fiddle with while she nurses. silicone teething necklace for mom BPA–free Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies Parents have been using herbal remedies for hundreds of years to help ease their baby’s teething pain (and loads of other ailments). Here are some ideas: Rosehip: Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants, rosehip tea is great for boosting the immune system. Additionally, rosehip has been shown to contain anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile: Chamomile is one of the more popular natural teething remedies. It helps relax and soothe irritability. Catnip: Catnip is said to calm irritable babies and help them rest. Clove: Clove is a natural anesthetic and has been shown to work as well as benzocaine at relieving pain. How to use herbal teething remedies How to use herbal teething remedies Make a tea: Any of these herbs can be made into a tea, which can be used to dampen a washcloth before freezing. Give as a beverage: To make a tea, boil water and steep 1 tsp of herbs in 10 ounces of water for 6–7 minutes. Let cool fully before serving to baby in a bottle or with a syringe. Rub directly onto gums: To make an herbal infusion that can be rubbed directly onto the gums, place herbs in a small saucepan and cover with olive oil. Simmer on low for 4-6 hours. Strain and store in the refrigerator. Dab some cool oil onto baby’s gums as needed. Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation Inflammation from teething can stimulate nerves that cause pain, so reducing inflammation is one way you can help relieve baby’s pain. Try a low inflammation diet: If baby is eating solids, white foods, such as refined sugar and flour, potatoes, and even dairy, can cause inflammation. Focus on paleo-type foods—a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, pastured meats, wild seafood, ample healthy fats (coconut, avocado, butter, and whole eggs). Lower stress: Over time, stress can cause inflammation. Make sure baby is getting enough rest and eating healthy foods in addition to breastmilk or formula. Balance blood sugar: Blood sugar swings (highs and lows) require the stress hormones to get involved to keep blood sugar stable (yes, even in babies and young children!). To keep blood sugar levels stable, focus on whole foods instead of highly processed snacks. Try to pair healthy carbs ( sweet potatoes and fruit) with protein and plenty of healthy fats. Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System There is some debate whether teething causes fevers and colds by lowering the immune system, or whether the two occurring at the same time is simply a coincidence. However, many parents do notice a runny nose or fever while baby is cutting teeth. At the very least, boosting the immune system can’t hurt and can help prevent baby from dealing with double ailments. Continue breastfeeding: Baby gets antibodies from your breastmilk to help build her immune system. Give baby vitamin D: Many of us (and our babies) are vitamin D deficient because of too little time outside in direct sunlight, and vitamin D plays an important role in supporting immune system function. Babies can take liquid vitamin D drops to get their levels up to a normal range. Give baby probiotics: Since most of the immune system resides in the gut, building healthy gut flora is important for overall health and immunity. Teething Isn’t Fun, But… Teething Isn’t Fun, But… Luckily there are lots of things you can do to help baby cope. Try some of these simple and natural teething remedies to help relieve pain at the gums. And don’t underestimate the importance of overall health to alleviate excess inflammation. Soon, baby will be back to normal… until the next tooth comes in! How About You?
  9. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  10. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  11. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  12. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  13. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure
  14. Stomach Soothers
  15. Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief
  16. 11 Superstar Stomach Soothers
  17. Settle The Queasies
  18. Relieve Gas
  19. Stop the Bathroom Runs
  20. Help Heartburn
  21. 14 Home Remedies To Try After Accidental Gluten Ingestion Source: https://www.gnom-gnom.com/14-home-remedies-accidental-gluten-ingestion/ 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work) Ready to restore sanity to your house? These safe, all-natural baby teething remedies really work to ease teething pain for good. Teething is no joke. It can turn even the most relaxed baby into a hot mess. Luckily, there are plenty of safe and effective natural teething remedies—no ibuprofen required. Let’s take a closer look. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure It’s one of the older natural teething remedies in the book, but using cold and pressure to help baby’s aching gums is an excellent teething remedy. Give baby safe, non-toxic objects that can be frozen and then used to chew on. The cold helps numb the area, and the pressure soothes inflamed gums. Here are some examples: Frozen washcloths:Soak a small washcloth in water, wring out, then freeze for at least an hour. Let baby chew on the washcloth after it comes the freezer. Frozen fruit or veggies: Put these foods in a mesh or silicone teether for small babies and freeze for at least an hour. For older babies, put a banana in the freezer for a tasty snack that’s also one of the best natural teething remedies. A cold spoon: Put a metal spoon in the fridge for at least 15 minutes, then give it to baby to gum. Natural teething biscuits: These biscuits are easy to make and don’t contain questionable ingredients the ones you buy in the store (even the organic ones!). They can be kept in the refrigerator for a cooler treat. Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys Something to chew on is sometimes one of the only natural teething remedies baby really needs to get through the pain of teething. There are lots of options for teething toys that are also safe and non-toxic. Silicone teething rings: Made of safe silicone, rather than latex or plastic, this teether is a safe choice. Wooden teethers: What works for one baby may not work for the next, so if silicone and rubber don’t do it, try a wooden teether. The texture might be just right for your baby. Just be sure to choose a brand that uses natural water-based sealants or food grade dyes. And be aware that some teethers need to be oiled or (bees)waxed before use. Sophie used to be the gold-standard when it came to natural teething remedies. But there’s been controversy after some moms found mold inside their toys. Until the manufacturer solves this problem, we don’t recommend this teether. Get free updates on baby’s first year! – Free Updates on First Year [In-article] Sign me up! Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces Amber necklaces Amber necklaces If you’ve been around the natural mama circuit, you’ve ly seen those cute amber necklaces on infants. They are actually amber necklaces. The idea is that baby’s body heat triggers the baltic amber to release an oil that contains succinic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory. Whether they work is up for debate, but many parents swear by them. Just be sure to get a real one—there are lots of fake amber teething necklaces. And if you do choose to try an amber necklace, be sure to remove it when baby goes to sleep, or wrap it around a wrist or ankle. Amber teething necklace Mama Natural Teething necklaces for mom Teething necklaces for mom Another option is a teething necklace for mom. These necklaces are made of silicone and are great for baby to use while sitting in mom’s lap or in a baby carrier. They also act as something for baby to fiddle with while she nurses. silicone teething necklace for mom BPA–free Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies Parents have been using herbal remedies for hundreds of years to help ease their baby’s teething pain (and loads of other ailments). Here are some ideas: Rosehip: Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants, rosehip tea is great for boosting the immune system. Additionally, rosehip has been shown to contain anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile: Chamomile is one of the more popular natural teething remedies. It helps relax and soothe irritability. Catnip: Catnip is said to calm irritable babies and help them rest. Clove: Clove is a natural anesthetic and has been shown to work as well as benzocaine at relieving pain. How to use herbal teething remedies How to use herbal teething remedies Make a tea: Any of these herbs can be made into a tea, which can be used to dampen a washcloth before freezing. Give as a beverage: To make a tea, boil water and steep 1 tsp of herbs in 10 ounces of water for 6–7 minutes. Let cool fully before serving to baby in a bottle or with a syringe. Rub directly onto gums: To make an herbal infusion that can be rubbed directly onto the gums, place herbs in a small saucepan and cover with olive oil. Simmer on low for 4-6 hours. Strain and store in the refrigerator. Dab some cool oil onto baby’s gums as needed. Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation Inflammation from teething can stimulate nerves that cause pain, so reducing inflammation is one way you can help relieve baby’s pain. Try a low inflammation diet: If baby is eating solids, white foods, such as refined sugar and flour, potatoes, and even dairy, can cause inflammation. Focus on paleo-type foods—a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, pastured meats, wild seafood, ample healthy fats (coconut, avocado, butter, and whole eggs). Lower stress: Over time, stress can cause inflammation. Make sure baby is getting enough rest and eating healthy foods in addition to breastmilk or formula. Balance blood sugar: Blood sugar swings (highs and lows) require the stress hormones to get involved to keep blood sugar stable (yes, even in babies and young children!). To keep blood sugar levels stable, focus on whole foods instead of highly processed snacks. Try to pair healthy carbs ( sweet potatoes and fruit) with protein and plenty of healthy fats. Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System There is some debate whether teething causes fevers and colds by lowering the immune system, or whether the two occurring at the same time is simply a coincidence. However, many parents do notice a runny nose or fever while baby is cutting teeth. At the very least, boosting the immune system can’t hurt and can help prevent baby from dealing with double ailments. Continue breastfeeding: Baby gets antibodies from your breastmilk to help build her immune system. Give baby vitamin D: Many of us (and our babies) are vitamin D deficient because of too little time outside in direct sunlight, and vitamin D plays an important role in supporting immune system function. Babies can take liquid vitamin D drops to get their levels up to a normal range. Give baby probiotics: Since most of the immune system resides in the gut, building healthy gut flora is important for overall health and immunity. Teething Isn’t Fun, But… Teething Isn’t Fun, But… Luckily there are lots of things you can do to help baby cope. Try some of these simple and natural teething remedies to help relieve pain at the gums. And don’t underestimate the importance of overall health to alleviate excess inflammation. Soon, baby will be back to normal… until the next tooth comes in! How About You?
  22. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  23. 6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)
  24. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure
  25. Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure
  26. Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys
  27. Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys
  28. Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces
  29. Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces
  30. Amber necklaces
  31. Amber necklaces
  32. Teething necklaces for mom
  33. Teething necklaces for mom
  34. Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies
  35. Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies
  36. How to use herbal teething remedies
  37. How to use herbal teething remedies
  38. Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation
  39. Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation
  40. Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System
  41. Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System
  42. Teething Isn’t Fun, But…
  43. Teething Isn’t Fun, But…
  44. How About You?

Stomach Soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!
Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Jamie Chung

Tummy troubles are never pretty, but they can be remedied with these options.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: When you get that roiling feeling.

What they do: Antacids, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain an element calcium or magnesium to neutralize the acid secreted by your stomach lining. Products such as Pepcid and Zantac, called H2 blockers, also help reduce the amount of acid that your stomach produces, alleviating reflux symptoms.

Be sure to use antacids as directed; you should take them to treat occasional pain, not pop them Tic Tacs. “Once in a while, sure, it’s fine to use antacids,” says Larry Weiss, a physician in San Francisco and a former consultant to the cruise industry on infectious stomach viruses.

“But if you’re taking them on a regular basis, you should talk to your doctor to find out exactly what the problem is.”

Advertisement

Advertisement

Jamie Chung

When to use it: When you are not near your own bathroom and can’t let a case of diarrhea subside naturally.

What it does: This ingredient (also known as pink bismuth) is found in over-the-counter products, Kaopectate and Pepto-Bismol, and doubles as an antacid and an anti-inflammatory. It works, and sometimes too well: A common side effect is constipation.

“Most diarrhea just needs to run its course,” says Weiss. “It’s best to let it clear up on its own.” (Note: This medicine should not be given to children. Salicylates, in rare cases, have been shown to cause Reye’s syndrome.)

Jamie Chung

When to eat them: After diarrhea or stomach upset.

What they do: “The BRATT diet has been used for years to help treat diarrhea,” says Lauren Slayton, a registered dietitian in New York City.

Bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast, plus tea, are the dream team to soothe stomach cramps and replenish your system. Such bland foods, containing simple sugars and starches with low acidity, are less ly to cause more distress.

And they supply easily digested nourishment. Yogurt is another safe bet.

Advertisement

Jamie Chung

When to drink them: After you’ve vomited (or otherwise expelled the contents of your angry stomach).

What they do:
When you lose fluids, you lose electrolytes and other nutrients.

Drinking Gatorade will rehydrate you, but Slayton prefers coconut water, a natural source of electrolytes and potassium (try O.N.E. coconut water, found in supermarkets).

Weiss s green, oolong, or blackberry-root tea, all of which have antioxidants and “soothe on an emotional level,” he says.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: If your stomach hurts or you feel bloated; use daily if you have chronic digestive issues.

What they do: The wonder botanicals ginger, peppermint, and fennel are natural remedies.

Ginger—freshly grated, dried, or candied—“improves the ease with which food moves through your system as it digests,” says Weiss. (Good old ginger ale contains little, if any, ginger; its curative values are largely anecdotal.

) Peppermint can aid digestion and settle the stomach because it contains properties that dispel gas and relieve cramping. Fennel seeds (nibbled on or drunk in a tea) can relieve bloating and minimize gas. Drink ginger, peppermint, or fennel tea after a rich or spicy meal to avoid indigestion.

If you regularly suffer from stomach upset, Slayton suggests you consult a doctor and take a peppermint-oil capsule ( Heather’s Tummy Tamers; $11, amazon.com) daily to help line and soothe your intestines.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: If you have stomach issues regularly. Try taking them daily, via foods or supplements.

What they do: Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that help maintain a healthy digestive tract. (Conversely, antibiotics kill bacteria, both good and bad.

) “Probiotics are your friends,” says Weiss. “We’re still not sure why exactly they work, but once people start taking them, many find they feel better.” Dairy products, yogurt, kefir, and buttermilk, contain different strains of acidophilus, a powerful probiotic.

(The probiotics in yogurt have actually been shown to shorten the duration of stomach upset.) You can also find supplements, Culturelle, and chewable probiotic tablets in health-food stores.

Look for Lactobacillus GG, an extensively studied form of acidophilus, or Bifidobacterium bifidum, also believed to be a well-tolerated immunity booster.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Source: https://www.realsimple.com/health/first-aid-health-basics/medicine-cabinet/stomach-soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

If you’re the type of person who keeps Rolaids in her pocket and Pepto-Bismol in her desk drawer, consider adding herbal teas to your stash to help you feel your best.

Since what we eat and drink (especially dairy products, sugar, alcohol, and coffee) often triggers conditions gas, bloating, indigestion, heartburn, constipation, and diarrhea, how better to treat these common gastrointestinal problems, herbalists say, than by ingesting herbs that naturally offset the culprits?

But with the ever growing variety of herbal teas and home remedies clogging the shelves of health food stores, it’s hard to know which ones will really help. There are numerous herbs that can affect the gastrointestinal system, according to Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden in London, Ontario.

Luckily, you don’t need to buy out the entire store to get relief. Peppermint, chamomile, and ginger are the three herbs most commonly used to soothe abdominal symptoms. “They’re versatile and a good place to start,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D.

(doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore.

Peppermint can do a lot more after dinner than just freshen your breath. The herb’s essential oil contains menthol, a volatile substance that has a direct antispasmodic effect on the smooth muscle of the digestive tract. In addition, the pleasing smell of peppermint tea may help soothe nerves (and thus a nervous stomach).

The ability to calm cramping stomach and intestinal muscles makes it a superb treatment, herbalists say, for symptoms of indigestion including heartburn, gas, stomachache, and the “I ate too much” feeling.

It also makes peppermint a popular alternative treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), an intestinal disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, and irregular bowel movements in up to 1 in 5 Canadians.

Science is starting to back up some of mint’s claims. A study published in the Journal of Gastroenterology in 1997 found that IBS patients taking peppermint-oil capsules for symptom relief experienced an approximately 40 per cent greater reduction in abdominal pain and a 50 per cent greater reduction in bloating and flatulence than those patients receiving a placebo.

A carminative (gas-relieving) herb, peppermint in the form of tea has long been used as a home remedy for flatulence.

A 1996 German study validates this usage, finding that patients with chronic indigestion not caused by an ulcer who were treated with an herbal preparation of peppermint oil combined with caraway oil (a bitter herb also believed to relieve gastrointestinal ailments) experienced about half as much abdominal pain due to gas as did people who received a placebo.

Even in the absence of abdominal symptoms, some herbalists recommend regular consumption of peppermint tea, saying it allows the entire gastrointestinal system to function more fluidly.

But, despite the enthusiastic reports, many doctors say that peppermint can lower the sphincter pressure of the esophagus, actually causing some people to have more heartburn. Even Dr. Stansbury avoids treating heartburn with peppermint.

If, however, people do experience relief from indigestion with peppermint or any other herbal therapy, Col. Peter McNally, D.O. (doctor of osteopathy), a gastroenterologist at the Evans Army Hospital in Colorado Springs, Colo., sees no harm in continuing to use the herb.

“At the very least, the extra consumption of water (through the teas) can be quite helpful in aiding digestion,” he says.

Chamomile, considered to be one of the safest medicinal herbs, is frequently recommended as a gentle treatment for common gastrointestinal problems. In Germany, where herbalism has long been considered conventional, tradition holds chamomile to be so useful that it has been dubbed alles zutraut, or “capable of anything.

” Indeed, for gastrointestinal ailments, it’s somewhat of a superherb. Antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, and carminative, chamomile can act upon the digestive system in a number of healing ways. It relieves flatulence and heartburn by mildly sedating and soothing the mucous membrane of the digestive tract.

Its natural sedative properties can also relax the entire body, which may help if your digestive discomfort is caused by stress or worry.

A caveat: While some research has found chamomile to be effective in relieving diarrhea in young children, Dr.

Stansbury strongly cautions against self-treating diarrhea with herbal remedies (for children or adults) until you have consulted with a medical professional.

“The body may be trying to rid itself of a toxin or harmful substance, and you don’t want to interrupt that process,” she advises.

Though widely used and highly praised as a safe natural remedy, chamomile may cause allergic reactions in individuals with sensitivities to ragweed, asters, and chrysanthemums.

Ginger, peppermint and chamomile, is a carminative and can be used to treat gas, along with its associated bloating and pain.

In botanical medicine it’s considered a warming herb, one that causes the inside of the body to generate more heat. Herbalists say this can help regulate sluggish digestion, though Dr.

Stansbury points out that some find this extra warmth uncomfortable and may instead prefer peppermint or chamomile teas.

But what makes ginger a standout among herbs is its effectiveness in treating nausea and vomiting.

(Remember Mom giving you ginger ale when you had a stomachache?) Herbalists now know that ginger works against both nausea and vomiting, making it an excellent preventive against motion and morning sickness.

And un its drug counterparts, ginger doesn’t cause drowsiness. Perhaps that’s why it’s a favourite in many a sailor’s first-aid kit.

Teas to ease an aching stomach

“Teas are the best way to take herbal gastrointestinal remedies,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D. (doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore.

The warm liquid is easy to digest and allow the remedy direct contact with the stomach and intestinal walls. Herbs in pill form can be hard to digest, and most tinctures contain alcohol, causing them to be absorbed largely in the mouth.

The one exception: Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers may use peppermint or chamomile tea and may also take peppermint in capsule form. The capsule allows the mint to maintain its potency until it reaches the intestines, where it calms the spasms characteristic of IBS.

Look for enteric-coated capsules containing .2 millilitre of oil; take one or two, up to three times a day between meals.

How to choose the tea for you

When selecting a tea, Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden, recommends looking for aromatic herbs: Can you smell the peppermint or ginger through the teabag? If not, the herb is probably past its prime. Look for a tea that has the date the herbs were harvested on the box; aromatic herbs should be less than a year old.

Next time your digestive system flares up, try one of these teas:

Peppermint: For a minty fresh herbal aid, the Herb Research Foundation in Boulder, Colo., recommends the following ratio of peppermint to water: Steep one to two teaspoons of dried peppermint leaves, or one tablespoon of fresh leaves, in one cup of hot water for five to 10 minutes; sweeten as needed with honey; and drink in the morning and after dinner.

Chamomile: Substitute dried or fresh chamomile flowers for the peppermint leaves in the above tea preparation.

Ginger: Steep ¼ to ½ teaspoon of dried ginger root powder in one cup of hot water. Sweeten with honey and drink at night as a digestive aid, or prepare as needed to prevent motion sickness.

Fresh ginger is delicious and just as effective as the dried kind. Dr. Stansbury suggests simmering three ¼-in. peeled slices of the root in one cup of water for 10 minutes, or to desired strength. Flavour with lemon and honey.

If you need immediate help on hand for your next trip to the amusement park, dried or candied ginger will also do the trick.

Originally published as Stomach Soothers on ReadersDigest.com.

Source: https://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/health/stomach-soothers/

11 Superstar Stomach Soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Skip the pale pink bottle. These cure-alls are proven to relieve stomach symptoms naturally.

Settle The Queasies

1. Pep Up with Peppermint

Peppermint contains menthol, which is a digestive aid. Try peppermint tea to ease nausea and vomiting. It’s simple to make your own pure cup (no sugar or other artificial flavors!) by steeping 1 tablespoon peppermint leaves in 1 cup hot water and then straining.

2. Rein It in with a Rub

Gently rubbing a point on your wrist has been proven to work as well as some drugs designed to fight nausea! To find the spot, turn your hand so that your palm is facing up. Measure three finger-widths down from your wrist. The spot is between the two tendons. Apply gentle downward pressure as you massage for 5 seconds.

3. Can the Nausea You may be able to settle an upset stomach with canned pear juice. Honestly, there is no scientific reason that has been uncovered as to why this trick works, but tons of people swear by it! Some doctors suspect it’s similar to the old-time remedy of cola syrup.

4. Stop Olive the Rumbling

Feel the pits due to motion sickness? Bring some olives along next time! Motion sickness causes you to make excess saliva, which can give you a gaggy feeling. But olives contain tannins, which dry out your mouth. Munching a few when you first start to feel the queasies may settle the nausea. Sucking on a lemon can produce the same effect.

5. Night Moves

If you’re prone to motion sickness, try to travel as much as you can at night. You’ll be less ly to feel sick when you can’t see the motion as well as you would during the day.

Relieve Gas

6. Send Gas Away with Caraway
End your meal with a cup of tea to head off any after-dinner grumbling. Simply sip 1 cup hot water steeped with 1 teaspoon caraway seeds.

Caraway can improve digestion and relieve intestinal spasms. For gas relief on the go, carry sugar-coated fennel seeds.

In fact, many Indian restaurants server sugar-coated fennel seeds instead of after-dinner mints.

Stop the Bathroom Runs

7. Save Those Pomegranate Peels
From trash to a digestive treasure! Tea made from pomegranate peels can appease your belly and help healing start to happen.

Next time you enjoy the fruit, grind the washed and dried peels in a blender or coffee grinder. The resulting powder will keep in the fridge for up to 6 months.

Then when you need relief, steep a teaspoon of the powder in a cup of boiling water for 3 minutes, strain, add a bit of honey, and sip slowly.

Help Heartburn

8. Grab Some Gum Chewing gum boosts saliva production, and that saliva neutralizes acid and helps push digestive juices back down where they belong.

9. Adjust Your Sleeping Position

If you sleep on your right side, roll over! The esophagus enters the stomach on the right side. Sleeping on your left side prevents food in your stomach from pressing on the opening to the esophagus, a good bet to bring on reflux.

10. A Legit Reason for More Bed Pillows

Sleeping with your head elevated prevents stomach acid from flowing into your esophagus.

11. Soothe with Juice

Sure, aloe is soothing for your skin, but can it really help your digestive tract? Some people with acid reflux swear it relieves heartburn symptoms. Backing up the claims, a study found drinking about an ounce of aloe vera syrup could safely relieve reflux symptoms. Run the idea by your doctor to see if it could work for you.

Bruce Lubin and Jeanne Bossolina-Lubin are the proud parents of three boys and more than a dozen books. After saving thousands per year using everyday tips and simple lifehacks, they started their own business in the hopes of sharing their knowledge with others. They have been known to go into their friends' refrigerators to turn their eggs upside down so that they last longer.

Source: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/11-superstar-stomach-soothers

14 Home Remedies To Try After Accidental Gluten Ingestion

Source: https://www.gnom-gnom.com/14-home-remedies-accidental-gluten-ingestion/

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!
Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Ready to restore sanity to your house? These safe, all-natural baby teething remedies really work to ease teething pain for good.

Teething is no joke. It can turn even the most relaxed baby into a hot mess. Luckily, there are plenty of safe and effective natural teething remedies—no ibuprofen required. Let’s take a closer look.

Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure

Stomach Soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!
Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Jamie Chung

Tummy troubles are never pretty, but they can be remedied with these options.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: When you get that roiling feeling.

What they do: Antacids, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain an element calcium or magnesium to neutralize the acid secreted by your stomach lining. Products such as Pepcid and Zantac, called H2 blockers, also help reduce the amount of acid that your stomach produces, alleviating reflux symptoms.

Be sure to use antacids as directed; you should take them to treat occasional pain, not pop them Tic Tacs. “Once in a while, sure, it’s fine to use antacids,” says Larry Weiss, a physician in San Francisco and a former consultant to the cruise industry on infectious stomach viruses.

“But if you’re taking them on a regular basis, you should talk to your doctor to find out exactly what the problem is.”

Advertisement

Advertisement

Jamie Chung

When to use it: When you are not near your own bathroom and can’t let a case of diarrhea subside naturally.

What it does: This ingredient (also known as pink bismuth) is found in over-the-counter products, Kaopectate and Pepto-Bismol, and doubles as an antacid and an anti-inflammatory. It works, and sometimes too well: A common side effect is constipation.

“Most diarrhea just needs to run its course,” says Weiss. “It’s best to let it clear up on its own.” (Note: This medicine should not be given to children. Salicylates, in rare cases, have been shown to cause Reye’s syndrome.)

Jamie Chung

When to eat them: After diarrhea or stomach upset.

What they do: “The BRATT diet has been used for years to help treat diarrhea,” says Lauren Slayton, a registered dietitian in New York City.

Bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast, plus tea, are the dream team to soothe stomach cramps and replenish your system. Such bland foods, containing simple sugars and starches with low acidity, are less ly to cause more distress.

And they supply easily digested nourishment. Yogurt is another safe bet.

Advertisement

Jamie Chung

When to drink them: After you’ve vomited (or otherwise expelled the contents of your angry stomach).

What they do:
When you lose fluids, you lose electrolytes and other nutrients.

Drinking Gatorade will rehydrate you, but Slayton prefers coconut water, a natural source of electrolytes and potassium (try O.N.E. coconut water, found in supermarkets).

Weiss s green, oolong, or blackberry-root tea, all of which have antioxidants and “soothe on an emotional level,” he says.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: If your stomach hurts or you feel bloated; use daily if you have chronic digestive issues.

What they do: The wonder botanicals ginger, peppermint, and fennel are natural remedies.

Ginger—freshly grated, dried, or candied—“improves the ease with which food moves through your system as it digests,” says Weiss. (Good old ginger ale contains little, if any, ginger; its curative values are largely anecdotal.

) Peppermint can aid digestion and settle the stomach because it contains properties that dispel gas and relieve cramping. Fennel seeds (nibbled on or drunk in a tea) can relieve bloating and minimize gas. Drink ginger, peppermint, or fennel tea after a rich or spicy meal to avoid indigestion.

If you regularly suffer from stomach upset, Slayton suggests you consult a doctor and take a peppermint-oil capsule ( Heather’s Tummy Tamers; $11, amazon.com) daily to help line and soothe your intestines.

Jamie Chung

When to use them: If you have stomach issues regularly. Try taking them daily, via foods or supplements.

What they do: Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that help maintain a healthy digestive tract. (Conversely, antibiotics kill bacteria, both good and bad.

) “Probiotics are your friends,” says Weiss. “We’re still not sure why exactly they work, but once people start taking them, many find they feel better.” Dairy products, yogurt, kefir, and buttermilk, contain different strains of acidophilus, a powerful probiotic.

(The probiotics in yogurt have actually been shown to shorten the duration of stomach upset.) You can also find supplements, Culturelle, and chewable probiotic tablets in health-food stores.

Look for Lactobacillus GG, an extensively studied form of acidophilus, or Bifidobacterium bifidum, also believed to be a well-tolerated immunity booster.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Source: https://www.realsimple.com/health/first-aid-health-basics/medicine-cabinet/stomach-soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

If you’re the type of person who keeps Rolaids in her pocket and Pepto-Bismol in her desk drawer, consider adding herbal teas to your stash to help you feel your best.

Since what we eat and drink (especially dairy products, sugar, alcohol, and coffee) often triggers conditions gas, bloating, indigestion, heartburn, constipation, and diarrhea, how better to treat these common gastrointestinal problems, herbalists say, than by ingesting herbs that naturally offset the culprits?

But with the ever growing variety of herbal teas and home remedies clogging the shelves of health food stores, it’s hard to know which ones will really help. There are numerous herbs that can affect the gastrointestinal system, according to Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden in London, Ontario.

Luckily, you don’t need to buy out the entire store to get relief. Peppermint, chamomile, and ginger are the three herbs most commonly used to soothe abdominal symptoms. “They’re versatile and a good place to start,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D.

(doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore.

Peppermint can do a lot more after dinner than just freshen your breath. The herb’s essential oil contains menthol, a volatile substance that has a direct antispasmodic effect on the smooth muscle of the digestive tract. In addition, the pleasing smell of peppermint tea may help soothe nerves (and thus a nervous stomach).

The ability to calm cramping stomach and intestinal muscles makes it a superb treatment, herbalists say, for symptoms of indigestion including heartburn, gas, stomachache, and the “I ate too much” feeling.

It also makes peppermint a popular alternative treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), an intestinal disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, and irregular bowel movements in up to 1 in 5 Canadians.

Science is starting to back up some of mint’s claims. A study published in the Journal of Gastroenterology in 1997 found that IBS patients taking peppermint-oil capsules for symptom relief experienced an approximately 40 per cent greater reduction in abdominal pain and a 50 per cent greater reduction in bloating and flatulence than those patients receiving a placebo.

A carminative (gas-relieving) herb, peppermint in the form of tea has long been used as a home remedy for flatulence.

A 1996 German study validates this usage, finding that patients with chronic indigestion not caused by an ulcer who were treated with an herbal preparation of peppermint oil combined with caraway oil (a bitter herb also believed to relieve gastrointestinal ailments) experienced about half as much abdominal pain due to gas as did people who received a placebo.

Even in the absence of abdominal symptoms, some herbalists recommend regular consumption of peppermint tea, saying it allows the entire gastrointestinal system to function more fluidly.

But, despite the enthusiastic reports, many doctors say that peppermint can lower the sphincter pressure of the esophagus, actually causing some people to have more heartburn. Even Dr. Stansbury avoids treating heartburn with peppermint.

If, however, people do experience relief from indigestion with peppermint or any other herbal therapy, Col. Peter McNally, D.O. (doctor of osteopathy), a gastroenterologist at the Evans Army Hospital in Colorado Springs, Colo., sees no harm in continuing to use the herb.

“At the very least, the extra consumption of water (through the teas) can be quite helpful in aiding digestion,” he says.

Chamomile, considered to be one of the safest medicinal herbs, is frequently recommended as a gentle treatment for common gastrointestinal problems. In Germany, where herbalism has long been considered conventional, tradition holds chamomile to be so useful that it has been dubbed alles zutraut, or “capable of anything.

” Indeed, for gastrointestinal ailments, it’s somewhat of a superherb. Antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, and carminative, chamomile can act upon the digestive system in a number of healing ways. It relieves flatulence and heartburn by mildly sedating and soothing the mucous membrane of the digestive tract.

Its natural sedative properties can also relax the entire body, which may help if your digestive discomfort is caused by stress or worry.

A caveat: While some research has found chamomile to be effective in relieving diarrhea in young children, Dr.

Stansbury strongly cautions against self-treating diarrhea with herbal remedies (for children or adults) until you have consulted with a medical professional.

“The body may be trying to rid itself of a toxin or harmful substance, and you don’t want to interrupt that process,” she advises.

Though widely used and highly praised as a safe natural remedy, chamomile may cause allergic reactions in individuals with sensitivities to ragweed, asters, and chrysanthemums.

Ginger, peppermint and chamomile, is a carminative and can be used to treat gas, along with its associated bloating and pain.

In botanical medicine it’s considered a warming herb, one that causes the inside of the body to generate more heat. Herbalists say this can help regulate sluggish digestion, though Dr.

Stansbury points out that some find this extra warmth uncomfortable and may instead prefer peppermint or chamomile teas.

But what makes ginger a standout among herbs is its effectiveness in treating nausea and vomiting.

(Remember Mom giving you ginger ale when you had a stomachache?) Herbalists now know that ginger works against both nausea and vomiting, making it an excellent preventive against motion and morning sickness.

And un its drug counterparts, ginger doesn’t cause drowsiness. Perhaps that’s why it’s a favourite in many a sailor’s first-aid kit.

Teas to ease an aching stomach

“Teas are the best way to take herbal gastrointestinal remedies,” says Jill Stansbury, N.D. (doctor of naturopathy), chair of the botanical medicine department at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Ore.

The warm liquid is easy to digest and allow the remedy direct contact with the stomach and intestinal walls. Herbs in pill form can be hard to digest, and most tinctures contain alcohol, causing them to be absorbed largely in the mouth.

The one exception: Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers may use peppermint or chamomile tea and may also take peppermint in capsule form. The capsule allows the mint to maintain its potency until it reaches the intestines, where it calms the spasms characteristic of IBS.

Look for enteric-coated capsules containing .2 millilitre of oil; take one or two, up to three times a day between meals.

How to choose the tea for you

When selecting a tea, Walter Kacera, Ph.D., an herbalist at the Apothecary Clinic in the Garden, recommends looking for aromatic herbs: Can you smell the peppermint or ginger through the teabag? If not, the herb is probably past its prime. Look for a tea that has the date the herbs were harvested on the box; aromatic herbs should be less than a year old.

Next time your digestive system flares up, try one of these teas:

Peppermint: For a minty fresh herbal aid, the Herb Research Foundation in Boulder, Colo., recommends the following ratio of peppermint to water: Steep one to two teaspoons of dried peppermint leaves, or one tablespoon of fresh leaves, in one cup of hot water for five to 10 minutes; sweeten as needed with honey; and drink in the morning and after dinner.

Chamomile: Substitute dried or fresh chamomile flowers for the peppermint leaves in the above tea preparation.

Ginger: Steep ¼ to ½ teaspoon of dried ginger root powder in one cup of hot water. Sweeten with honey and drink at night as a digestive aid, or prepare as needed to prevent motion sickness.

Fresh ginger is delicious and just as effective as the dried kind. Dr. Stansbury suggests simmering three ¼-in. peeled slices of the root in one cup of water for 10 minutes, or to desired strength. Flavour with lemon and honey.

If you need immediate help on hand for your next trip to the amusement park, dried or candied ginger will also do the trick.

Originally published as Stomach Soothers on ReadersDigest.com.

Source: https://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/health/stomach-soothers/

11 Superstar Stomach Soothers

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Skip the pale pink bottle. These cure-alls are proven to relieve stomach symptoms naturally.

Settle The Queasies

1. Pep Up with Peppermint

Peppermint contains menthol, which is a digestive aid. Try peppermint tea to ease nausea and vomiting. It’s simple to make your own pure cup (no sugar or other artificial flavors!) by steeping 1 tablespoon peppermint leaves in 1 cup hot water and then straining.

2. Rein It in with a Rub

Gently rubbing a point on your wrist has been proven to work as well as some drugs designed to fight nausea! To find the spot, turn your hand so that your palm is facing up. Measure three finger-widths down from your wrist. The spot is between the two tendons. Apply gentle downward pressure as you massage for 5 seconds.

3. Can the Nausea You may be able to settle an upset stomach with canned pear juice. Honestly, there is no scientific reason that has been uncovered as to why this trick works, but tons of people swear by it! Some doctors suspect it’s similar to the old-time remedy of cola syrup.

4. Stop Olive the Rumbling

Feel the pits due to motion sickness? Bring some olives along next time! Motion sickness causes you to make excess saliva, which can give you a gaggy feeling. But olives contain tannins, which dry out your mouth. Munching a few when you first start to feel the queasies may settle the nausea. Sucking on a lemon can produce the same effect.

5. Night Moves

If you’re prone to motion sickness, try to travel as much as you can at night. You’ll be less ly to feel sick when you can’t see the motion as well as you would during the day.

Relieve Gas

6. Send Gas Away with Caraway
End your meal with a cup of tea to head off any after-dinner grumbling. Simply sip 1 cup hot water steeped with 1 teaspoon caraway seeds.

Caraway can improve digestion and relieve intestinal spasms. For gas relief on the go, carry sugar-coated fennel seeds.

In fact, many Indian restaurants server sugar-coated fennel seeds instead of after-dinner mints.

Stop the Bathroom Runs

7. Save Those Pomegranate Peels
From trash to a digestive treasure! Tea made from pomegranate peels can appease your belly and help healing start to happen.

Next time you enjoy the fruit, grind the washed and dried peels in a blender or coffee grinder. The resulting powder will keep in the fridge for up to 6 months.

Then when you need relief, steep a teaspoon of the powder in a cup of boiling water for 3 minutes, strain, add a bit of honey, and sip slowly.

Help Heartburn

8. Grab Some Gum Chewing gum boosts saliva production, and that saliva neutralizes acid and helps push digestive juices back down where they belong.

9. Adjust Your Sleeping Position

If you sleep on your right side, roll over! The esophagus enters the stomach on the right side. Sleeping on your left side prevents food in your stomach from pressing on the opening to the esophagus, a good bet to bring on reflux.

10. A Legit Reason for More Bed Pillows

Sleeping with your head elevated prevents stomach acid from flowing into your esophagus.

11. Soothe with Juice

Sure, aloe is soothing for your skin, but can it really help your digestive tract? Some people with acid reflux swear it relieves heartburn symptoms. Backing up the claims, a study found drinking about an ounce of aloe vera syrup could safely relieve reflux symptoms. Run the idea by your doctor to see if it could work for you.

Bruce Lubin and Jeanne Bossolina-Lubin are the proud parents of three boys and more than a dozen books. After saving thousands per year using everyday tips and simple lifehacks, they started their own business in the hopes of sharing their knowledge with others. They have been known to go into their friends' refrigerators to turn their eggs upside down so that they last longer.

Source: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/11-superstar-stomach-soothers

14 Home Remedies To Try After Accidental Gluten Ingestion

Source: https://www.gnom-gnom.com/14-home-remedies-accidental-gluten-ingestion/

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!
Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

6 Baby Teething Remedies (That Really Work)

Stomach Soothers That Will Give You Real Relief – Finally!

Ready to restore sanity to your house? These safe, all-natural baby teething remedies really work to ease teething pain for good.

Teething is no joke. It can turn even the most relaxed baby into a hot mess. Luckily, there are plenty of safe and effective natural teething remedies—no ibuprofen required. Let’s take a closer look.

Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure

Baby Teething Remedy #1: Apply Cold and Pressure

It’s one of the older natural teething remedies in the book, but using cold and pressure to help baby’s aching gums is an excellent teething remedy. Give baby safe, non-toxic objects that can be frozen and then used to chew on. The cold helps numb the area, and the pressure soothes inflamed gums.

Here are some examples:

  • Frozen washcloths: Soak a small washcloth in water, wring out, then freeze for at least an hour. Let baby chew on the washcloth after it comes the freezer.
  • Frozen fruit or veggies: Put these foods in a mesh or silicone teether for small babies and freeze for at least an hour. For older babies, put a banana in the freezer for a tasty snack that’s also one of the best natural teething remedies.
  • A cold spoon: Put a metal spoon in the fridge for at least 15 minutes, then give it to baby to gum.
  • Natural teething biscuits: These biscuits are easy to make and don’t contain questionable ingredients the ones you buy in the store (even the organic ones!). They can be kept in the refrigerator for a cooler treat.

Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys

Baby Teething Pain Relief #2: Try Teething Toys

Something to chew on is sometimes one of the only natural teething remedies baby really needs to get through the pain of teething. There are lots of options for teething toys that are also safe and non-toxic.

  • Silicone teething rings: Made of safe silicone, rather than latex or plastic, this teether is a safe choice.
  • Wooden teethers: What works for one baby may not work for the next, so if silicone and rubber don’t do it, try a wooden teether. The texture might be just right for your baby. Just be sure to choose a brand that uses natural water-based sealants or food grade dyes. And be aware that some teethers need to be oiled or (bees)waxed before use.

Sophie used to be the gold-standard when it came to natural teething remedies. But there’s been controversy after some moms found mold inside their toys. Until the manufacturer solves this problem, we don’t recommend this teether.

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Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces

Infant Teething Remedy #3: Use Teething Necklaces

Amber necklaces

Amber necklaces

If you’ve been around the natural mama circuit, you’ve ly seen those cute amber necklaces on infants. They are actually amber necklaces.

The idea is that baby’s body heat triggers the baltic amber to release an oil that contains succinic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory. Whether they work is up for debate, but many parents swear by them.

Just be sure to get a real one—there are lots of fake amber teething necklaces.

And if you do choose to try an amber necklace, be sure to remove it when baby goes to sleep, or wrap it around a wrist or ankle.

Amber teething necklace Mama Natural

Teething necklaces for mom

Teething necklaces for mom

Another option is a teething necklace for mom. These necklaces are made of silicone and are great for baby to use while sitting in mom’s lap or in a baby carrier. They also act as something for baby to fiddle with while she nurses.

silicone teething necklace for mom BPA–free

Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies

Baby Teething Pain Relief #4: Experiment With Herbal Remedies

Parents have been using herbal remedies for hundreds of years to help ease their baby’s teething pain (and loads of other ailments).

Here are some ideas:

  • Rosehip: Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants, rosehip tea is great for boosting the immune system. Additionally, rosehip has been shown to contain anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Chamomile: Chamomile is one of the more popular natural teething remedies. It helps relax and soothe irritability.
  • Catnip: Catnip is said to calm irritable babies and help them rest.
  • Clove: Clove is a natural anesthetic and has been shown to work as well as benzocaine at relieving pain.

How to use herbal teething remedies

How to use herbal teething remedies

  • Make a tea: Any of these herbs can be made into a tea, which can be used to dampen a washcloth before freezing.
  • Give as a beverage: To make a tea, boil water and steep 1 tsp of herbs in 10 ounces of water for 6–7 minutes.

    Let cool fully before serving to baby in a bottle or with a syringe.

  • Rub directly onto gums: To make an herbal infusion that can be rubbed directly onto the gums, place herbs in a small saucepan and cover with olive oil. Simmer on low for 4-6 hours. Strain and store in the refrigerator.

    Dab some cool oil onto baby’s gums as needed.

Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation

Baby Teething Remedy #5: Lower Inflammation

Inflammation from teething can stimulate nerves that cause pain, so reducing inflammation is one way you can help relieve baby’s pain.

  • Try a low inflammation diet: If baby is eating solids, white foods, such as refined sugar and flour, potatoes, and even dairy, can cause inflammation. Focus on paleo-type foods—a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, pastured meats, wild seafood, ample healthy fats (coconut, avocado, butter, and whole eggs).
  • Lower stress: Over time, stress can cause inflammation. Make sure baby is getting enough rest and eating healthy foods in addition to breastmilk or formula.
  • Balance blood sugar: Blood sugar swings (highs and lows) require the stress hormones to get involved to keep blood sugar stable (yes, even in babies and young children!). To keep blood sugar levels stable, focus on whole foods instead of highly processed snacks. Try to pair healthy carbs ( sweet potatoes and fruit) with protein and plenty of healthy fats.

Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System

Baby Teething Remedies #6: Boost the Immune System

There is some debate whether teething causes fevers and colds by lowering the immune system, or whether the two occurring at the same time is simply a coincidence. However, many parents do notice a runny nose or fever while baby is cutting teeth. At the very least, boosting the immune system can’t hurt and can help prevent baby from dealing with double ailments.

  • Continue breastfeeding: Baby gets antibodies from your breastmilk to help build her immune system.
  • Give baby vitamin D: Many of us (and our babies) are vitamin D deficient because of too little time outside in direct sunlight, and vitamin D plays an important role in supporting immune system function. Babies can take liquid vitamin D drops to get their levels up to a normal range.
  • Give baby probiotics: Since most of the immune system resides in the gut, building healthy gut flora is important for overall health and immunity.

Teething Isn’t Fun, But…

Teething Isn’t Fun, But…

Luckily there are lots of things you can do to help baby cope. Try some of these simple and natural teething remedies to help relieve pain at the gums. And don’t underestimate the importance of overall health to alleviate excess inflammation. Soon, baby will be back to normal… until the next tooth comes in!

How About You?